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Heather Gamble
@heather-gamble
8 years ago
145 posts

ok i copied this from another dread site but ive used "teas" before and this seems pretty good figured id share and maybe get your brews as wellThe benefits of dreadlock hair tea (also called a dreadlock hair rinse) are that they tend to clarify hair and remove any last traces of shampoo or conditioner residue that may remain on the hair shaft.There is one well-known company that specializes in hair tea specifically for dreads. However, you can made a homemade hair tea quickly and easily using natural herbs that you have in your cupboard (or can be found in any reputable health food store).Whether using the professional stuff or your own homemade brew do not expect overnight success as it will take a quite few applications to get visible results (we're talking at least two or three months of regular use here folks). Just give the herbs, and the minerals they contain, a fighting chance to do their work.Homemade All-Purpose Dreadlock Hair Tea RecipeChamomile brings out the natural blonde and golden color highlights in light-colored hair.If your hair is dark use rosemary instead. While it won't give you highlights, the herb's been known to help hair grow faster.INGREDIENTS:1/2 cup dried chamomile flowers (if you have dark hair then substitute with the same amount of rosemary)4 cups waterDIRECTIONS:Preheat your pot. Pour this water away. Turn on the tap to cold water and let it run a few seconds. This ensures the water is fully aerated (water sitting in the pipes loses oxygen) and quite cold.Boil the two ingredients for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let the tea brew three to five minutes. Longer will be stronger.Strain using a cheesecloth and let cool. Apply the solution to recently washed dreadlocks.Make sure you rinse it off thoroughly with a lot of cool or tepid water within 20 minutes.Which Herbs Are "Hair Herbs"?Chamomile: Another very useful herb for hair, traditionally used for lighter colour hair.Horsetail: Helps brittle hair due to its high silica content.Mint: Stimulates the scalp due to its action on the blood capillaries.Nettle: Treats dandruff and stimulates hair growthRosemary: Excellent for all hair types and problems, especially hair growth.Sage: Traditionally used to restore colour to greying hair. As a hair rinse, it removes dandruff.Thyme: Good for oily hair and dandruff.Most of the herbs that are used for hair teas are processed with steam as opposed to full oxidization so that the leaves keep a green to golden color. If you do have brown leaves, that's fine...it just means that you'll be able to store your hair tea longer (up to 12 months).NOTE: The "hair herb" list is not considered final or exhaustive. Further research should be done before using the herbs in your own formulas. In fact, we suggest contacting a master herbalist in your local area if you're interested in creating your own herbal teas.Do's and Don'ts for Dreadlock Hair TeaDO's:Refrigerate leftover hair tea for 10-14 days in an airtight stainless steel or glass container.Store professionally-made dreadlock hair teas for between 6-12 months in an airtight container in a cool, dry place or else it may spoil.DON'Ts:Refrigerate tea in an aluminum containerReuse tea bags.Freeze your hair teas.Store your hair tea near spices, garlic, or other strong smelling foods. Such smells can permeate the tea. Once tea is tainted by an outside odor throw it away.Drink hair teas. In fact put your dreadlock hair tea in a clearly marked container away from your food.As a parting shot, here's some dreadlock hair tea tips to get the most out of your dreadlock hair rinse.Don't like the smell a particular dreadlock hair tea? Put in two drops of essential oil for each cup of solution you're using.Have a huge dandruff, residue or lint problem living in your locks? Add apple cider vinegar (ACV) to any tea to help treat dandruff.Stuck with moist or wet leaves? If tea gets damp you can spread it out in a pan and dry it in the oven (only if it hasn't started to get moldy...you don't want anything more to do with moldy leaves).


updated by @heather-gamble: 02/14/15 04:33:16PM
☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
8 years ago
28,958 posts
great post thnx..featuring it


--
27 years growing dreadlocks the natural way
My dreads are over 10 feet long

also on the board of, and a student glider pilot with freedoms wings international - soaring for people with disabilities
neil coe
@neil-coe
8 years ago
361 posts
yes very informative
Heather Gamble
@heather-gamble
8 years ago
145 posts
yea with all the scalp issues and dandruff goin around i figured this could be helpful
Mike3
@mike3
8 years ago
13 posts
Been meaning to try this, thanks for the recipe.
Mae
@mae
8 years ago
1 posts
This is great! I am finishing up my first year (of 3) of training to be a herbalist, and i completely agree with all of the above... and now have a new niche to dive into with gusto! Thank you.
Olle
@olle
7 years ago
4 posts

It's awesome what you can do with herbs!

Erica Thomas
@erica-thomas
7 years ago
1 posts

i love herbs, i want to be an herbalist, i already am collecting containers.

Angel Frye
@angel-frye
7 years ago
409 posts

You've left off a whole slew of Indian herbs which have been used for centuries in the hair. I've written info about the individual herbs by the ones I have personally used.

Here's a link to a reputable dealer: http://www.fromnaturewithlove.com/soap/IndianSkin.asp

Amla:slightly moisturizing. very soothing to the scalp

Aritha: this is 'soapnut' which has a slight lather. Use for squeaky clean hair. Drying.

Bhringraj

Henna: colors the hair, calms itch, cools the scalp during the summer. Very relaxing to use with essential oils like sandalwood oil and other spices like cloves and cinnamon. You can change the tint and the scent. I suggest Jamilla brand henna. It is the most consistent and trustworthy. Fine grained and silky smooth.

Sandalwood

Shikakai

Orange and lemon peel: detox.

Neem: anti-itch.

Angel Frye
@angel-frye
7 years ago
409 posts

Here's a link to a reputable eBayer who specializes in aritha(soapnut): Soapnut listing

As you can see, this fruit shell can be used for anything from laundry, to dishes, to body and hair soap. I've used the powdered form of the shell on my lock(in a tea) and have been quite pleased by the results. I would like to try using the plain shells, though, and make a 'tea' with them as suggested and traditionally used in India.

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