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Sulfur Soaps for dandruff and to promote growth?

Angel Frye
@angel-frye
6 years ago
409 posts

I've been reading quite a bit lately about sulfur shampoos and body soaps to help with many skin issues and I was curious as to whether or not any dreadheads here have tried them for their hair.

According to what I've been reading, 10% sulfur is the MAX to use on body or hair and it helps with dandruff, acne, yeast growths, bacteria, psoriasis, and also to assist in hair growth.

Anyone have any opinions on this ingredient?


updated by @angel-frye: 01/13/15 09:15:53PM
☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
6 years ago
27,886 posts

never tried it but sulpher powder is a lice treatme t too

but its nasty stuff




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KnottyPrincess
@knottyprincess
6 years ago
122 posts

Don't get in your eyes. TRUST ME!

Castaway J
@castaway-j
6 years ago
588 posts

hmm is it eco friendly? i think so right?

Angel Frye
@angel-frye
6 years ago
409 posts

Well, I think it's eco friendly. It's a naturally occurring element when mined directly from a quarry or it can be found as a by-product which is then sold off.

I've been thinking about trying to add some powder to a melt-and-pour soap base I found to use on face and hair. There is a variety of sulfur called 'sublimed' sulfur which has hardly any smell at all. I can't use salicylic acid on my skin and I've had great results with sulfur masks in the past(think: the Proactiv mask) so when I read about sulfur being a good ingredient to have in hair shampoos for growth and scalp help I thought I'd ask around here and see what everyone thinks or has heard/experienced.

Wiki quote: "elemental sulfur has been used mainly as part of creams to alleviate various conditions such as scabies, ringworm, psoriasis, eczema and acne. The mechanism of action is not known, although elemental sulfur does oxidize slowly to sulfurous acid, which in turn (through the action of sulfite) acts as a mild reducing and antibacterial agent."

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