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My dreads suck a** (with pictures)

Trico
@trico
3 weeks ago
3 posts

Hi.

Alright. I'm going to act ignorant despite all the information I've read about dread maintenance, care, and what to expect with new dreads. I got my dreads a week ago and I hate the way they look right now.

I don't know what specific method they used to make my locks. The person who made them would section my hair, then divide that section into various strands, tangle the hair up, use a crochet, then finish the dread up by palm rolling.

I kind of knew what I was getting into. I have really thin, sparse hair and figured out that I wasn't going to have a lot of dreads like the people on Pinterest way before I decided to get them. The guy who made my dreads said this also, but he also said that he was going to balance "volume with quantity" given my hair type and I believed him. Yet, here I stand, pretty self-conscious about the whole situation.

Apart from wondering if they are going to get any better, I have some questions about the actual maintenance:

I was told I should wash my hair once a week for a month, then wash it 1-2 times a week after that period of time. They itch like crazy so I'm probably going to wash them twice a week when the time comes. Is this accurate?

I use a rubber band (the type that has cloth around it, I'm not sure what they are called) to hold my hair up for when I'm at school. It's not tight at all, in fact, it feels like it's slipping out most of the time. Besides, I can't get all my dreads in the pony tail since they all differ in length. Is this a good idea? I do this because otherwise I look pretty crazy.

I was also told to retwist once a month. I think that's a little excessive. What do you think?

Big no to beanies, caps, or tams. I'm alright with the caps and maybe even the beanies. But no tams yet? Why not? I do use a headband when I'm at home and when I sleep.

I moisturize with a combination of rose water and vitamin E that I spray directly onto my dreads. Good idea?

That's it for now. Thank for you reading and thank you for your comments in advance.

Much love.

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updated by @trico: 06/25/19 11:46:47PM
Peaceful_Passer
@peaceful-passer
3 weeks ago
139 posts

They look fine my friend. Just don't ever go back!!! Wash 2-3-5 times a week (just btw sure they fully dry between washes)... the cleaner the better! No waxes. I'd say brush them out but i know what 5 partially crocheted dreads did to my hair, just leave them alone and separate as needed. It's your hairs pulling unnaturally that itches, they gave me sores on my head :(. Do nothing but keep your head clean and they will do the rest on their own. Be careful of oils, they'll grab dirt. I use fresh aloe and want to rosemary but I'm leary of any oils. When i brushed my last set out i found a lot of dirt on my hairs because of the oils i had used. Once in the beginning i even used coconut oil 😣. If it can wash out with water good, if it's heavy avoid it. Have confidence my friend, you look good, and trust your hairs to do their thing, on their own time :)


updated by @peaceful-passer: 06/26/19 12:30:45AM
Trico
@trico
3 weeks ago
3 posts

Peaceful_Passer:

They look fine my friend. Just don't ever go back!!! Wash 2-3-5 times a week (just btw sure they fully dry between washes)... the cleaner the better! No waxes. I'd say brush them out but i know what 5 partially crocheted dreads did to my hair, just leave them alone and separate as needed. It's your hairs pulling unnaturally that itches, they gave me sores on my head :(. Do nothing but keep your head clean and they will do the rest on their own. Be careful of oils, they'll grab dirt. I use fresh aloe and want to rosemary but I'm leary of any oils. When i brushed my last set out i found a lot of dirt on my hairs because of the oils i had used. Once in the beginning i even used coconut oil 😣. If it can wash out with water good, if it's heavy avoid it. Have confidence my friend, you look good, and trust your hairs to do their thing, on their own time :)

Thank you for the reply.

I was told to use coconut oil for the itchiness, and I used some the first week because I couldn't take it anymore. It did nothing, so I might as well not use any and avoid the consequences given your advice.

I will give it time. I've been reading a lot of stuff online and comparing my dreads with others's. Probably a bad idea, since we all have different hair types.

It's relieving to know I can wash more than once a week. I'm washing my hair later tonight for sure. 

You didn't say anything about re-twisting and using a rubber band, though. I cut off the top of a beanie and I'm using it as a headband. At least my dreads won't be up and about anymore.

Much love.

Peaceful_Passer
@peaceful-passer
3 weeks ago
139 posts

Try fresh aloe. Sometimes the pulp gets left behind but you could strain it first or pick it out, comes out easy. Rosemary Essential oil is good for the scalp, dilute with water, try using a misting bottle. Something loose I dont imagine would cause much harm but you definitely want then to be free to move as much as possible. I kept my last set of locks up in a ponytail a lot in the beginning and i think that contributed to much of the bulkiness at the bottoms, but mine were freeform, I'm sure that makes a big difference. This set I've left down completely but the for occasional bun but i have long hair that ties around itself. Soaring eagle uses the sleeve of a t-shirt i remember him saying. Try not to compare yourself, your hairs look good! There's no need to twist. If it can break the hairs, don't do it, that's my philosophy since seeing how much hair came out of the crocheted hairs i had compared to the freeform.


updated by @peaceful-passer: 06/26/19 09:10:54PM
Trico
@trico
3 weeks ago
3 posts

Peaceful_Passer:

Try fresh aloe. Sometimes the pulp gets left behind but you could strain it first or pick it out, comes out easy. Rosemary Essential oil is good for the scalp, dilute with water, try using a misting bottle. Something loose I dont imagine would cause much harm but you definitely want then to be free to move as much as possible. I kept my last set of locks up in a ponytail a lot in the beginning and i think that contributed to much of the bulkiness at the bottoms, but mine were freeform, I'm sure that makes a big difference. This set I've left down completely but the for occasional bun but i have long hair that ties around itself. Soaring eagle uses the sleeve of a t-shirt i remember him saying. Try not to compare yourself, your hairs look good! There's no need to twist. If it can break the hairs, don't do it, that's my philosophy since seeing how much hair came out of the crocheted hairs i had compared to the freeform.

I understand. No re-twisting. My hair is super fragile as it is, I wouldn't want it breaking. But won't the difference be too noticeable between the dreaded hair and the new growth coming from the roots? Will it also dread if I leave it alone, separate, etc?

Thanks again. You've been really helpful.

FemalePheromones
@femalepheromones
3 weeks ago
407 posts

You can tell the hair was crocheted as they kind of look like stiff rods rather than soft rope which will be why your scalp itches because the hair is being pulled tight at the scalp. I had mine crocheted 2 years ago (ended up combing them all out because I hated them) and I had the same itchiness at first.

I'd fuck the rubber band off. Besides the fact that they look think and stiff they actually look neat when you've got them down. It's not like they're all sticking up in different directions. On top of that it will really do help you out in the long run to start embracing the mess because as the new hair grows it will start to look messier. This leads in to what you said about the difference between the dreads and the new growth. There will be quite a difference because the new growth will dread a bit differently so the dreads will be thicket and softer at the roots b ecause they're not pulled ridiculously tight like they are with the crochet hook. Worst comes to worse in time you will have long dreads that all have tight, thin, stiff ends from what was crocheted which you could always just cut off when you have enough length that a decent amount of hair will still be left behind. Or you may decide it doesn't bother you and leave it as it is.

When I combed out my crocheted dreads I lost quite a bit of hair because the crochet hook actually constantly breaks your hairs but then pulls them together so tight that the broken bits can't go anywhere. Have you ever shaved your ead or face with an electric trimmer? The same kind  of small hairs were all over the place and the hair than I had left on my head was very thing compared to what it was before and I have always had really thick hair. Also when combing them out I realised that a lot of the dreads were full of some sort of grey gunk. That shit had been on my head for 6 month which makes me feel sick to think about. I guess that it was shampoo that had got into the dreads but because they were so tight it got trapped and couldn't get back out. This isn't necessarily going to be the same for you but it's worth knowing what can happen.




--
I'm on Twitter @FemalePheromone
Peaceful_Passer
@peaceful-passer
3 weeks ago
139 posts

FemalePheromones:

You can tell the hair was crocheted as they kind of look like stiff rods rather than soft rope which will be why your scalp itches because the hair is being pulled tight at the scalp. I had mine crocheted 2 years ago (ended up combing them all out because I hated them) and I had the same itchiness at first.

I'd fuck the rubber band off. Besides the fact that they look think and stiff they actually look neat when you've got them down. It's not like they're all sticking up in different directions. On top of that it will really do help you out in the long run to start embracing the mess because as the new hair grows it will start to look messier. This leads in to what you said about the difference between the dreads and the new growth. There will be quite a difference because the new growth will dread a bit differently so the dreads will be thicket and softer at the roots b ecause they're not pulled ridiculously tight like they are with the crochet hook. Worst comes to worse in time you will have long dreads that all have tight, thin, stiff ends from what was crocheted which you could always just cut off when you have enough length that a decent amount of hair will still be left behind. Or you may decide it doesn't bother you and leave it as it is.

When I combed out my crocheted dreads I lost quite a bit of hair because the crochet hook actually constantly breaks your hairs but then pulls them together so tight that the broken bits can't go anywhere. Have you ever shaved your ead or face with an electric trimmer? The same kind  of small hairs were all over the place and the hair than I had left on my head was very thing compared to what it was before and I have always had really thick hair. Also when combing them out I realised that a lot of the dreads were full of some sort of grey gunk. That shit had been on my head for 6 month which makes me feel sick to think about. I guess that it was shampoo that had got into the dreads but because they were so tight it got trapped and couldn't get back out. This isn't necessarily going to be the same for you but it's worth knowing what can happen.

There was a photo of crocheted and then allowed to freeform for a year i think, i can't remember by who (Maybe you??) The difference was HUGE, in  a GREAT way! It's worth the transition.

The freeform locks won't be so "perfect" tidy, they'll have personality, they won't hurt and pull and itch, they'll be authentically all originally yours =)


updated by @peaceful-passer: 06/27/19 11:36:10AM
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