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Forum Activity for @baba-fats

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/21/12 09:22:54PM
2,730 posts

It's not a race


Introduce Yourself

This isn't an introduction to myself. Most of you already know me, anyway.

This is an introduction to your new journies.

I hear it a lot. Many people start their locks with the anticipation that in a few days or weeks, they will have nice formed mature locks. Some people will even be willing to damage their hair in order to make their dredlocks look older. I know many of you have come to terms with the fact that it's a process that takes time and patience, but there's a new person almost once a week that has some story about how they either crochet'd, or used wax, or palm rolled, or went to a salon, only to find out that after their first wash, all that work and money they spent was for nothing.

So I compiled a few pictures of members in various stages of their journey. I I know most people don't actually check the photos of member unless they are urged to by the forum topic or specifically asked to.

Don't worry. Every person featured has been notified that I am using their pics

Here you go:


updated by @baba-fats: 02/14/15 02:09:12AM
Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/21/12 06:44:06AM
2,730 posts

need some dread friends super quick


Dreadlocks Journey Emotional Support

Some people do get dandruff. There are easy ways to get rid of it. The BS wash with the right oils clears it up really quick after a few washes.

I have had mine for over 5 years. I never had dandruff. I never had a bugs in my hair, and I hike 3-5 days a week in the summer. (in reality, most bugs that like hair like hair they can crawl around in. They don't like locks because the roots are too tangled and they can't move around easily). And I have never had any problem finding a job. There's a featured post that Eagle made as a letter to employers. Read it. If you grew you locks for a spiritual reason, they are protected by the first amendment.

We're all here, willing to help you out with any problems you might face. If anyone give you a hard time, someone here probably went through it before and can give you a hand

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/21/12 06:29:12AM
2,730 posts

hello to all...


Introduce Yourself

I"m glad we could help.

And my girlfriend parents went to Santorini last summer. The pictures they brought back were amazing. I hope I can get there one day

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/18/12 04:43:13PM
2,730 posts

Question on Sectioning with twist and rip


General Questions

That's what I was about to say. 100 locks would have to be really thin. If you look at my locks, the ends that you can see are about 1 inch each. And I had 23 to start. I congoed a bunch together to make them bigger, but from what you can see, that's about how thick 1 inch sections would end up

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/18/12 08:28:56AM
2,730 posts

i want my dreads back!


Introduce Yourself

Well... Firs you have to let new ones grow to maturity. Then I guess you could either crochet/sew/felt your old ones back one. But just growing your news ones out to an age that they are even mature enough to do anything like that with can take another year or so. You can't just take straight hair and attach locks to the bottoms. I guess you could sew loops to the root part of the old locks and make dread falls for now, but that might look silly if the rest of your hair is completely straight.

It's best to just go through the motions again and let the journey start all over. If you still want your old locks attached in a year, There are people on here who did it. You could do a search to find out exactly how it was done

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/17/12 09:51:57PM
2,730 posts

Sectioning


Dreading Methods

Most of what I was going to be was already said here. But to add... It's better to have them not be uniform. If you do it somewhat naturally, or even completely natural, you'll have a myriad of shapes and sizes. Not only is this method healthier, but it also avoids having scalp showing in between the squares of the sections.

Now to the loss of length... Most people tend to lose 1/3 to 1/2 of their original length. So you will probably end up with locks around shoulder length. But as they mature, your will be astonished at how fast your hair will grow. I had one that was 1 inch long when I first started and after 5 years it's over a foot long

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/17/12 06:34:37PM
2,730 posts

fat Locks take special care


Dreads Hair and Scalp Health

I sent this to a friend a while ago, but I figured he shouldn't be the only one here who gets to read it. This is my method for washing and drying locks, for those of you who have super fat sections and don't want to make them smaller. First off, Awesome. I love fat locks. Join the club.

Second: It's an ordeal, but it's been working for me this long:

First make sure you get all of the soap out of your locks. As they mature they will hold soap in deeper and longer. You'll have to start being extra careful that none is left in. I do this by rinsing for much longer and take each individual lock between my fingers and rolling/squeezing it under the running water.

As for drying. After you wash and rinse, before you even get out of the shower, take a section of your hair and wring it out like you would a wet towel starting from the root and twisting your way down to the tip. Then move to another section and do it to that one. Once you've gotten all of your head wrung out once, do it again. After the second time, I recommend taking each individual lock and carefully wringing them out by themselves. This is tedious, but it helps a ton. When you finally do step out of the tub, your hair will pretty much not be dripping at all. However even the few second it takes to reach a towel will allow for the water that is deep in the lock to get soaked to the surface. Take a towel, now, and if you can get all of you locks into it, wrap the towel around them and wring them out all at once. If you want to, you could take a few locks at a time and wring them out instead. That might even be a little better and easier (just more time consuming).

Ok, so now most of the water is wrung out. They will drip a bit, but from here on out, if it's summer and you want to let them air dry, you can go right ahead with no worry. But if it's either too cold, or you have somewhere to go and want them to dry even more, that's where I use a blow dryer. Set it on high and make sure you move it around a lot. I tend to sit down and lean forward so my locks are dangling in front of me and blow dry them away from me, but make sure you do get the top and back or your head too. This can get tiring and your arm might get sore after a few mintues. It's up to you. If you want them extra dry, you can take a towel and drape it over your head to create a backdrop to catch the wind. But if you do this you have to be extra careful to move the dryer around even more often. You could even play it safe and set it on "cool" or press that little button for cold air so you aren't doing any heat damage to your hair. If you use the backdrop technique, turn off the Ionizing setting on your dryer (if it has one), because Ionizing hair dryers create ozone which is toxic to breathe in. They don't create much, but it's just to be on the safe side. Even if you use the ionizing switch, you should only do it if your bathroom is well ventilated.

If you do use the dryer, use it for only about 2-5 minutes at first. Then let them drip for a little while. As they sit, the water on the inside of your locks will eventually get absorbed to the surface again. After a couple of hours, if you want to, you can hit them with the dryer again for another minute or 2.

If you wash later in the day (any time after noon), give each lock a squeeze before you go to bed. If you feel any dampness, hit them with a dryer again before you go to sleep. It's okay if they are still mildly damp when you go to bed, but you want them as dry as you can get them.

Thick locks really do take an age and a half to dry completely. It's important to make sure they are dry before getting them wet again. I'd say on average, with locks that are about 1 inch in diameter, this method will let them completely dry in about 10-12 hours. If you don't use a blow drier at all, they can still be mildly damp for up to 24 hours.

That's another reason you want to make sure all of the soap is out. I've finished washing and drying only to feel a lock and notice that 4 hours into my drying that it's still got soap in it. Then I had to jump back in the shower and rinse all over again and have to start drying all over again.

Good luck.


updated by @baba-fats: 06/10/16 02:04:39PM
Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/17/12 06:23:40PM
2,730 posts

Question on Sectioning with twist and rip


General Questions

Cool. Good.

1 inch sections? That's about as big as you probably want to go. Any bigger and your looking at locks the width of your wrist or wider. Locks that big look cool, but trust me, they suck to dry. It's not so bad in summer when I am outside a lot, but in winter, you don't want your hair wet for that long. 1 inch sections should be fine. If you find that they take an age to dry let me know I'll try to give you a hand

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/17/12 01:01:35PM
2,730 posts

Happy Hippie Chick


Introduce Yourself

Yay! Glad you started recovering so well from crocheting. It's usually very hard for most people.

It's good you embraced all the cool nappy phases of your journey. That's part of what growing locks is all about

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
04/17/12 12:49:44PM
2,730 posts

Question on Sectioning with twist and rip


General Questions

I have about 5 locks with sections between 2-3 inches. The smaller ones are between 1-2 inches. Those ones can take up to 12 hours to dry, and the bigger ones can take as long as 24 hours. If you really want locks that big, PM me and I can give you some advice on how to help dry them a little faster, but in reality, they can be a real pain to dry, especially if you need them dry in a hurry if you have to go somewhere. I'd leave the front ones as is, and redo the fat ones to makes them smaller.

And like Eagle said, take out those bands. If your locks are going to be fat, they will be heavy. And bands cause kinks that weaken the integrity of the lock. In time they won't be able to support the weight, and can cause locks to fall out or break off.

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