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Dreads & racism

Chloë
@chlo
7 years ago
12 posts
I've noticed that it's always African Americans that criticize my boyfriend and I for having dreads. I am not being racist, it is simply an observation. I never really got it until today but people have talked about/given looks to my boyfriend. Caucasians compliment our hair all the time but it's always African Americans who make a big deal about it. I find this to be very racist. I don't believe that dreadlocks "belong" to any race or culture since they are not only ancient but many people are wearing them for many different purposes. Even so, that would be like me saying that African Americans can't eat ravioli because that's an Italian meal.Has anyone else noticed this? Do adults act like this or is it just because they're asinine high school kids?
updated by @chlo: 02/14/15 03:31:35AM
Jdwood
@jdwood
7 years ago
275 posts
It's called a double standard. A lot of people do it in one form or the other. It's just the way our society functions. Example I have very pale skin almost albino, my face is reddish sometime but the rest of me is very white, I have a very low tolerance to the sun ( I have no tan lines :)). A lot of people think it's "okay" to make negative comments on my paleness because it is unusual but if I would make a comment on the darkness of someones skin it would not be tolerated. It's all about labels and what is accepted as 'normal'.I like your ravioli analogy.
Rae
@rae
7 years ago
74 posts
I never thought about that before... I have VERY pale skin as well and people do comment on it (complete strangers too!); made me REALLY selfconscious in high school. I might start calling people out on it though, something like "Would you make a similar comment if my skin was really dark?"As far as comments about dreads I've found the exact opposite from you Chloe. I've received more negative comments from white people, where as several black men and women recognize my frizzy mess as the start of dreads and ask me lots of questions, showing a genuine interest in my hair.Where do you live? I wonder if local culture has anything to do with it...

Jdwood said:
It's called a double standard. A lot of people do it in one form or the other. It's just the way our society functions. Example I have very pale skin almost albino, my face is reddish sometime but the rest of me is very white, I have a very low tolerance to the sun ( I have no tan lines :)). A lot of people think it's "okay" to make negative comments on my paleness because it is unusual but if I would make a comment on the darkness of someones skin it would not be tolerated. It's all about labels and what is accepted as 'normal'.
I like your ravioli analogy.
dreadlockedlady
@dreadlockedlady
7 years ago
39 posts
I wasn't going to comment but I have to ask...what are they saying or are they just looking at you funny? Do they specifically say that because you are white that you shouldn't have dreads?Are you and these people in high school (which I am assuming from your last sentence)?
Chloë
@chlo
7 years ago
12 posts
Yes, they will say something like "look at that white boy with dreads," and laugh. And yes we are in high school

dreadlockedlady said:
I wasn't going to comment but I have to ask...what are they saying or are they just looking at you funny? Do they specifically say that because you are white that you shouldn't have dreads?
Are you and these people in high school (which I am assuming from your last sentence)?
Natasha Boss
@natasha-boss
7 years ago
14 posts
Dreadlocks have been worn throughout time by many different races of people. I don't know why there is a recent misconception that rastafarians started it. Samson was told to have had dreadlocks as well as the Nazorites, Chinese Emperors, and so on.
Jdwood
@jdwood
7 years ago
275 posts
I live in Quebec Canada but I have traveled a lot and this happen to me in many places

Rachel Adelle said:
I never thought about that before... I have VERY pale skin as well and people do comment on it (complete strangers too!); made me REALLY selfconscious in high school. I might start calling people out on it though, something like "Would you make a similar comment if my skin was really dark?"

As far as comments about dreads I've found the exact opposite from you Chloe. I've received more negative comments from white people, where as several black men and women recognize my frizzy mess as the start of dreads and ask me lots of questions, showing a genuine interest in my hair.

Where do you live? I wonder if local culture has anything to do with it...

Jdwood said:
It's called a double standard. A lot of people do it in one form or the other. It's just the way our society functions. Example I have very pale skin almost albino, my face is reddish sometime but the rest of me is very white, I have a very low tolerance to the sun ( I have no tan lines :)). A lot of people think it's "okay" to make negative comments on my paleness because it is unusual but if I would make a comment on the darkness of someones skin it would not be tolerated. It's all about labels and what is accepted as 'normal'.
I like your ravioli analogy.
Jdwood
@jdwood
7 years ago
275 posts
bobbie blainei have a few friends who are really, really, i mean really dark and everyone makes fun of them for it (including their black and white friends). so i think it goes both ways. people make fun of other people when they look different and it will always be that way (as far as skin tone goes) until we all eventually become one color : )Like I said a lot people do that in form or an other, a double standard. An other example I have been slim all my life and I would get comments on how 'skinny' I was ( I am still slim but not as skinny) it did not bother me but I know that If I would say to some one that he or she is fat...well we all know that it might not go down as well. It's just the way we are I think like you said in our society we are 'bothered' by what is different and are influence by what is judged to be correct.
NaturalWomyn
@naturalwomyn
7 years ago
849 posts
all in all people it really doesn't matter if you're tall or short, fat or skinny, pale or dark have dreads or straight hair there's always going to be someone who feels the need to comment about it. Ya just gotta let it roll off your back! If you don't allow it to bother you then it will no longer be an issue. Nobody is immune from stupid and sometimes hurtful comments from others. You can't control what people say to you so just embrace it! Learn to love what makes you unique! When I was young (6th grade maybe?) My biggest problem in life was my lips were too big and I was tall. LOL! People pay money for big lips and wear crazy shoes to be taller! So now when anyone say's something to me about my height (5'9") Wow you're tall for a girl I say I know thank you! So if someone says something like oh look white boy with dreads you say yes I am! Thanks for noticing!Be proud and those things shouldn't bother you. Many Blessings My Beautiful Phreaks!!!!
Bongani Vincent
@bongani-vincent
7 years ago
2 posts
what I've generally found is if it was not your dreads people comment on it would be your freakishly long fingers (had a couple of these comments thrown my way) and ussually from people with short staunch fingers. :)whatevs...
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