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Not dread related, but question about Didjeridoos...

MiDread
@midread
11 years ago
187 posts
Hey everyone! Anybody out there quite knowledgeable about Didjeridoos????? I LOVE them and would like to learn how to play one. Came across a great source for them, but not knowing ANYTHING about them, I have no idea how the prices compare. They had all different kinds (agave) and ranged in price from almost $1,000.00 to $130.00. They are all hand made and beautiful (no PVC or anything like that).Sunday is my last day to grab one before they move on (It was at a local art fair). The couple selling them were awesome (from New Mexico) and played for me. It was the most hypnotic and beautiful thing I have ever heard. Apparently they are very accomplished musicians.Anyway - anyone have any advice either way?
updated by @midread: 02/14/15 02:26:17AM
Janice
@janice
10 years ago
49 posts

Hi from Canada

I bought my first didge for Cdn $55 and the second for Cdn $25. The first is carved and heavy & beautiful, I think eucalyptus? I don't know what type of wood. The second is lighter and painted. Every didge has its own distinct drone, no two exactly alike. If I could afford a "real" one straight from Australia, made/decorated/blessed by Aborigines, that is what I would go for. Mine are from Indonesia, and I just don't think the spirit is the same. Anyway, I learned how to play by watching YouTube, got some great tips on circular breathing (which I still can't do worth shite, IMO). I would consider making my own from PVC if I had time. For my next musical purchase I really want a hang drum! omg, talk about amazing and hypnotic!!!

Cheers

Cliff Loc*head
@cliff-lochead
10 years ago
21 posts

I purchased a didge in Australia when i visited it cost A$165. The proper Aus ones are hollowed out by ants. Its got a turtle carved on it and is beautifully painted.

☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
10 years ago
29,515 posts

1000??????????????????????

i traded a t shirt for my 1st 1 at a rainbow gathering

u can totalty get a way waty way better deal

130 is outragouse 1000 is highway robbery




--
30 years growing dreadlocks the natural way
My dreads are over 10 feet long

also on the board of, and a student glider pilot with freedoms wings international - soaring for people with disabilities
Gabriel Beauchemin
@gabriel-beauchemin
10 years ago
50 posts

I think you can practise circulat breathing before buying it by putting a straw in a bottle of war. Then try to blow in it the more time possible. With circular breating you should be able to blow in it infinity of time without interruption. It need a lot of practise I think.

Star Mercer
@star-mercer
10 years ago
34 posts

My husband plays. I've tried but I've never been able to get it right. We have two. I honestly couldn't tell you exactly what they are made out of, but my favortite ones are the ones that have the big flaired(?) end. I don't think thats the proper name for them, but its like a bell on the end. I agree that no two sound the same. It depends on what they're made of, how their made and how you play. All sound beautiful though. I, as well and my two children (2 & 5) love the sound. I think it's a very soothing sound. :)

Good luck with finding the one that fits you and learning to play. It's a truely amazing instrument!

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
10 years ago
2,702 posts

Um... $130 is a great price. But... it won't be all that great quality. If you want something that's high quality, you'll be spending something around $300+

What you want to look for is clarity of tone, back pressure, undertones, hoot note, what key it's in and if it's steady, and if it likes to be played fast or slow (that's up to how you play) but it's important for which one you buy.

Check out Didjshop.com

They have tons of selections. I have one that I made from bamboo and another my parents got me a few years ago. bamboo use beeswax for the mouthpiece, normal wood don't. It's personal preference.

Didjshop also has samples of how each one sounds

Star, it's called a bell, and those can be mad from all sorts of wood. Some are made from agave, but eucalyptusis most common in Australia. But any other wood can be made for that flare.

Circular breathing is actually not to hard to learn. What you need to do is blow out like blowing through a straw but keep you cheeks puffed up. When you need to breath in through your nose, push your cheeks together pushing that extra air out while you inhale through your nose. It changes the pressure of the breath, thus changing the tone you'll make. You can do it with your hand in front of your mouth to feel if you are really still exhaling, or you can do it with a straw and cup of water, but that's messy and not too practical if you are not at home

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
10 years ago
2,702 posts

I want a hang drum too, but unfortunalty, they are not made anymore. it's a hard find. Only one guy in I thin it was Sweden made them, and he stopped a few years ago. Good luck finding one. And if you do, let me know I really want one too

Janice said:

Hi from Canada

I bought my first didge for Cdn $55 and the second for Cdn $25. The first is carved and heavy & beautiful, I think eucalyptus? I don't know what type of wood. The second is lighter and painted. Every didge has its own distinct drone, no two exactly alike. If I could afford a "real" one straight from Australia, made/decorated/blessed by Aborigines, that is what I would go for. Mine are from Indonesia, and I just don't think the spirit is the same. Anyway, I learned how to play by watching YouTube, got some great tips on circular breathing (which I still can't do worth shite, IMO). I would consider making my own from PVC if I had time. For my next musical purchase I really want a hang drum! omg, talk about amazing and hypnotic!!!

Cheers

Star Mercer
@star-mercer
10 years ago
34 posts

A bell... Eh, I was close. :)

Baba Fats
@baba-fats
10 years ago
2,702 posts

lol. you got it

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