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Location: Atlanta, GA
Zipcode: 30330
Country: US


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Nikkiah Simons
08/25/13 08:09:10PM @nikkiah-simons:

Well hello... How they comin along???????

the Barrellady
08/12/13 02:24:09AM @the-barrellady:

Hi Vescha, I do have some more tips to share with you. I used the baking soda wash / ACV rinse for my entire first year. Loved it. It exfoliates the scalp without scrubbing and disturbing the dreading process. Unless you have an oily scalp, always follow up with and ACV rinse after a baking soda wash. I skipped the ACV for a couple of months and slowly fried out my hair, it took months to make it soft again with the help of essential oils. The ACV balances back the hair and scalps natural PH levels, so very important to use that. Here is a posting I have about the proper ratios: Now I use the BS / ACV once a month and use dread shampoo for the other times. I don't think it would be necessary for you to use ACV after using Dr.Bronners, only the BS changes the hairs natural PH levels.

I see you did some T&R and some neglect dreads. I have another posting with many fantastic tips on there for you:

In the first year you will go through so many changes. Some days it will look so messy and perhaps get you down. Just put on a loose tam on those days if going out, that helps. I looked like a troll for about a month or so at a certain stage, would not take pics during that time. When you have down days, just try to envision your dreads 2 or 3 years from now and know that they will look beautiful when all mature, the dreadlocks you always wanted.

When dreads are fully mature, they take about 24 hours to dry if they are 1 inch or smaller where the hair meets the scalp. This is when they get washed once a week. By that time the scalp adjusts and does not produce oils like it does with undreaded hair. You can certainly get them wet more often, but just make sure they are dry before going to bed. Before they are mature you can get them wet every day if you want, as they dry much quicker, but again, don't go to bed with wet dreads. Feel free to rinse your head with water if you have sweat and it is not your day to shampoo.

My last tip: I have very hard well water, the shampoo from www.dreadlockshampoo works fantastic with hard water, with all types in fact. The liquid form is a locking up shampoo, good for the journey. Bars are better used on mature dreads, then you can rub the bar right on them. For dreads not yet mature, if using a dread shampoo of any kind, best to wash the scalp only, using your fingertips. When you rinse out the shampoo, it will run through your sections cleaning them as it goes. This way you don't disturb any progress.

Hope all this helps you out, ask me questions any time at all......peace

the Barrellady
07/28/13 02:32:12AM @the-barrellady:

Welcome to the community Vescha and to your recent journey to mature dreads. Below is a map so you can see your water type, Dr. Bronners does not work properly with hard water, will slowly leave a residue build up, with soft water it works beautifully.

I also stared with T&R after naturally separating mine, here are some great tips for you: ....peace

Baba Fats
07/26/13 05:12:26PM @baba-fats:


How much water are you using with the BS? 1tsp of BS is only enough for about 1/2 cup of water. I'm sure you use more water than that. The ratio for the BS wash should be 1/2 cup BS for every 5 cups of water. And if you don't have naturally oily hair, you should rinse that out after 10-20 minutes, and then do an ACV rinse right away. Don't wait days before ACV. This is because BS is a base. it will raise your hair and scalps pH level too high. Leaving your pH that high for so long will actually fry your scalp and hair. Making it become weak and brittle.

Also, it sound like you're getting your hair wet almost every day. As your locks progress, they will take longer and longer to dry. You'll want to start getting into the habit of only getting them wet between 1-3 times a week. Unless it's extremely hot and sunny, and your hair will dry fast outside.

Your hair may feel dry to the touch, but that doesn't mean it's not still wet inside. And not allowing your locks to dry completely, in between washes, creates a great environment for mold/mildew to grow

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