please also join the new dreadlockssite 3.0 mobile pc responsive beta site at ww3.dreadlockssite.com

This site looks and works best in firefox.
Use this menu for quick access to dreading guides pages, and forums sections.

All content on this site is copyrighted, see our terms of service for details

Clean healthy natural dreads community

DreadlocksSite.com is the best place to learn how to grow and care for healthy natural dreadlocks.

Dreadlocks free and easy no products no pricetags

Best dreadlocks shampoo

download our toolbar


please consider donating to support dreadlockssite.com your donations help keep the site running.

Latest Activity


bands and musicians
David DaSilva loved Allan's photo
49 minutes ago
Natalie loved Cat Telfer's blog post Natural Dreadhead
55 minutes ago
Sussi replied to Sussi's discussion Sussis T&R timeline 2 years 10 months
"Thank you so much Sarah, arran craig and Moon Child! When I first started out I loved timelines so…"
1 hour ago
Profile IconLee Ness, Natalie, Allison rash and 2 more joined Dreadlocks Natural Dreads DreadlocksSite.com
2 hours ago
Natalie left a comment for ☮ soaring eagle ॐ
"Thank you for the welcome and thank you for creating this site. I already feel like it's a…"
3 hours ago
Natalie loved Eric Organiscak's discussion The journey
3 hours ago
Natalie loved Brandon Riggins's discussion A true self expression
3 hours ago
Natalie loved Sarah's discussion Baking Soda = Clean Dreads... and Shower!
5 hours ago
Natalie loved tyler rakowski's discussion dreadlocks and how they change you
5 hours ago

dread gurus
☮ soaring eagle ॐ left a comment for Natalie
5 hours ago

crafty crafters
Megan Atwood commented on Megan Atwood's photo
Thumbnail

Happy dreadies!

"Thanks everyone=]"
9 hours ago

bands and musicians
Eric Organiscak loved Donna's photo
9 hours ago
Profile IconEric Organiscak and Lauryn Dowding joined bill's group
Thumbnail

we love soaring eagle

just a group to say thanks to SE for making this site and spreading the truth about dreads on the…See More
9 hours ago

bands and musicians
Eric Organiscak loved Aika's photo
9 hours ago

vip supporters
Sterling updated their profile
9 hours ago
Panga loved Ixchel's photo
17 hours ago
Panga loved California Emmet's photo
17 hours ago
Panga posted a photo
17 hours ago
NaturalDreads01 commented on NaturalDreads01's photo
Thumbnail

And another

"Hehe, thanks! :D"
20 hours ago
R. Oh Mithrandir loved Kayla's photo
20 hours ago
Africans

Black Africans and people of Black African descent are known to wear this hairstyle. Various African tribes wear locks and the styles change from one group to another. The warriors of The Maasai tribesmen of Kenya are famous for their long, thin, red dreadlocks. These men dye their hair red with root extracts. In West Africa what are known as Fetish priests, spiritual men or women who serve and speak to spirits or deities, often wear locks. In Benin the priests of the Yoruba religion of Olokun the spirit of water wear locks. The Hemba people in the southeast of Congo-Kinshasa also dye their dreadlocks red, but their style is thicker than that of the Maasai. Other tribes include the Fang people of Gabon, the Mende of Sierra Leone, and the Turkana people of Kenya.

Africans brought the hairstyle with them to the Americas during the African diaspora. As a result of this the style can still be seen on people of African descent from North America, South America and the Caribbean. Well-known Black artists such as Bob Marley, George Clinton, Rosalind Cash, Whoopi Goldberg, Alice Walker, Eddy Grant, Toni Morrison, Lauryn Hill, Lenny Kravitz, Bobby McFerrin, Tracy Chapman, Terrance Hobbs and Mike Smith of death metal band Suffocation, Malcolm Jamal Warner, Living Colour, Lil Wayne and Keith Hamilton Cobb wear (or have worn) the hairstyle. Even though it is not always political, some black people wear dreadlocks as a symbol of black pride and cultural identity. For some women, it’s a way to break free both from western standards of beauty and from chemically straightening their hair.

Rastafari

The Rastafarians wear locks as an expression of inner spirituality and to emphasize their identity. Their religion states that they must remain "whole" (hence why Rastafarian Bob Marley refused to have a cancerous toe removed which could have saved his life). Following Haile Selassie, cutting dreads is highly prohibited in the Rasta culture. Due to this, dreads knot naturally because their hair is not to be tampered with.

Another interpretation among the Rastafari is that "dread" refers to the fear that dreadlocked Mau Mau warriors inspired among the colonial British.[citation needed] The Mau Mau, a largely ethnic Kikuyu rebel group in Kenya fighting to overthrow their colonial British oppressors from 1952–1960, hid for many years in the forests, during which time their hair grew into long locks. The images of their rebellion, then broadcast around the world, are said to have inspired Jamaican Rastafari to wear locks.[9]

Dreadlocks on a Rasta's head are symbolic of the Lion of Judah which is sometimes centered on the Ethiopian Flag. Rastas hold that Selassie is a direct descendant or reincarnated form of Christ. Rasta's also believe African people are the descendants of the Israelites' Tribe of Judah through the lineage of Kings of Israel David and Solomon, and that he is also the Lion of Judah mentioned in the Book of Revelation.

Hinduism

Similarly, among some Sadhus and Sadhvis, Indian holy men and women, locks are sacred, considered to be a religious practice and an expression of their disregard for profane vanity, as well as a symbol of their spiritual understanding that physical appearances are unimportant. The public symbol of matted hair is re-created each time an individual goes through these unique experiences.[citation needed] In almost all myths about Shiva and his flowing locks, there is a continual interplay of extreme asceticism and virile potency, which link the elements of destruction and creation, whereas the full head of matted hair symbolizes the control of power.[citation needed]

Gangadhara Shiva captures and controls the river Ganges with his locks, whose descent from the heavens would have deluged the world. The river is released through the locks of his hair, which prevents the river from destroying earth. As the Lord of Dance, Nataraja, Shiva performs the tandava, which is the dance in which the universe is created, maintained, and resolved. Shiva's long, matted tresses, usually piled up in a kind of pyramid, loosen during the dance and crash into the heavenly bodies, knocking them off course or destroying them utterly.
Sadhu with jata (long locks) twisted in a knot on top of the head.

Locks in India are reserved nearly exclusively for holy people. According to the 'Hymn of the longhaired sage' in the ancient Vedas, long jatas express a spiritual significance which implies the wearer has special relations with spirits, is an immortal traveller between two worlds and the master over fire:

The long-haired one endures fire, the long-haired one endures poison, the long-haired one endures both worlds. The long-haired one is said to gaze full on heaven, the long-haired one is said to be that light ... Of us, you mortals, only our bodies do you behold. ...For him has the Lord of life churned and pounded the unbendable, when the long-haired one, in Rudra’s company, drank from the poison cup (The Keshin Hymn, Rig-veda 10.136)

The Shaiva Nagas, ascetics of India, wear their jata (long hair) in a twisted knot or bundle on top of the head and let them down only for special occasions and rituals. The strands are then rubbed with ashes and cowdung, considered both sacred and purifying, then scented and adorned with flowers.

Western Styles

When reggae music gained popularity and mainstream acceptance in the 1970s, the locks (often called “dreads”) became a notable fashion statement; they were worn by prominent authors, actors, athletes and rappers, and were even portrayed as part and parcel of gang culture in such movies as Marked for Death.
Dreadlocks have moderate popularity in western heavy metal culture. Pictured is Chris Barnes, the vocalist of the death metal band Six Feet Under.

With the Rasta style in vogue, the fashion and beauty industries capitalized on the trend. A completely new line of hair care products and services in salons catered to a white clientele, offering all sorts of "dreadhead" hair care items such as wax (considered unnecessary and even harmful by some)[citation needed], shampoo, and jewelry. Hairstylists created a wide variety of modified locks, including multi-colored synthetic lock hair extensions and "dread perms", where chemicals are used to treat the hair.

Locked models appeared at fashion shows, and Rasta clothing with a Jamaican-style reggae look were sold. Even exclusive fashion brands like Christian Dior created whole Rasta-inspired collections worn by models with a variety of lock hairstyles.

In the west, dreadlocks have gained particular popularity among certain subcultures. Examples of these are the New Age Traveller, hippie, crust punk, hyphy and gothic subcultures. Also it has gained popularity as a style among youth of both Black African and European descent. Members of the cybergoth sub-culture often wear blatantly artificial "dreadfalls" made of synthetic hair, fabric or plastic tubing.

source wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadlocks

that sorta paints the west as being totaly devoid of spirituality

i would like to add my own ramblings on the westernized spirituality of dreadlocks that are not superficial fashion based or idol worship

the western dread culture is avery wide variety of beliefs
from earth based religions and native culture spirituality (like native american) to rastafarian to pagan cristian jew and wican buddhist or muslim
virtualy every religion and soirituality has some dreadiness in its roots (no pun intended)
often you might even find a blending of beliefs
with a return to a more natural existence at the core
there is a strong urge in the face of modern industrilization and strict government control to return to a more natural existence living more in harmony with nature and being more free, at least feeling in some way government control is not total

even for those who cannot take it all the way, loving off the grid in harmony with nature and as much as possible outside the grasp of government control, at least adopting a natural hairstyle lets them feel more connecterd to the earth and less controlled by the strict expectations of society

so you may thinkj this sounds more like rebelion then spirituality
but the rebelion can be very much a spiritual rebelion.a deep love for the earth for living harmoniously many give up meat (without having to believe its religiously right to) they preffer natural products and ofteen become more conceinstios of how they treat others.
often therrs a profound spiritual connection to the dreads themselves. often they are spoken of as antenaes to higher reasonings or roots that ground them to the earth and connect them to all things.
some dreasds take peices of other cultures like tthe aversion to vanity
or the avoidance of alcahol
in western culture the connection of dreads to religion and spirituality is more indivuidual and often very deep.

at times this goes above and beyond the expectations of theyre individual religions. like in christianity and judeism the vow of the naserine often is ignored and concidered obsolete but a member of that religion may choose to honour that vow and grow out long dreadlocks for life

the western culture and its connection to rekligios or spiritual dreading is far more difficult to define because its such a blend of beliefs that there could easily be 10,000 definitions

Tags: culture, dreadlocks, religious, significance, spirituality

Views: 11945

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I consider the dreadfalls worn in the cybergoth sub-culture to be in a pseudo spiritual sensuality. Cybergoth is largely based on artistic expression inspired by the modern primitive movement. It's kind of a mixture taken from various books and movies about cyberpunk and post apocalyptic settings. Like modifying self, environment and objects to suit ones own needs.

In reality, I don't feel it has much relation to that anymore....it's just a pretty way of dressing by people mildly interested in counter-culture...
SE and I talked about the Nazerine vows in another thread...I'll find it for ya. :)

Jelly said:
Nazarites wore their hair locked. Sampson had seven locks, which he cut and lost his strength. A few restrictions that went with it: no grapes or raisins - to include wine and vinegar, avoidance of the deceased (exceptions are allowed, Sampson was a warrior.), the vow must last no less than 30 days and is as simple as when seeing another person in observation of the Nazarite vow and saying to oneself, "Me, too."

I should find a link, but i haven't ad coffee yet.

J
Permalink Reply by echolynnrain on August 12, 2009 at 1:51am
Delete I wanted to add this...the story of Samson and Delilah. A lot of you have probably heard the story even if you're not a Christian. If you don't know the story...in a nutshell it is this...

Samson has super strength from God...and it's in his locks of hair. Delilah tries to trick him into telling her his secret. She cuts it off while he's sleeping and it grows back. She eventually brings him down by tricking him one again and he prays and then brings down the pillars on the people who wanted to kill him. There are scholars and Christains I know who believe that the locks were in fact dreads. When I get dreads going I may have to use this if I'm discriminated at a church, lol. :)
► Reply to This
Permalink Reply by soaringeagle on August 12, 2009 at 3:04am
Send Message
tell them u took the vow of the nazerine



The Nazirite vow involved 3 things - no alcohol, including all products of the grape vine, uncut hair for a time, and no contact with the dead:

"And The Lord said to Moses, "Say to the people of Israel, When either a man or a woman makes a special vow, the vow of a Nazirite, to separate himself to The Lord, he shall separate himself from wine and strong drink; he shall drink no vinegar made from wine or strong drink, and shall not drink any juice of grapes or eat grapes, fresh or dried. All the days of his separation he shall eat nothing that is produced by the grapevine, not even the seeds or the skins. All the days of his vow of separation no razor shall come upon his head; until the time is completed for which he separates himself to The Lord, he shall be holy; he shall let the locks of hair of his head grow long. All the days that he separates himself to The Lord he shall not go near a dead body. Neither for his father nor for his mother, nor for brother or sister, if they die, shall he make himself unclean; because his separation to God is upon his head. All the days of his separation he is holy to The Lord." (Numbers 6:1-8 RSV)

When the period of the vow ended, the Nazirite then burned his shaven hair and presented a number of offerings to God (Numbers 6:10-21). While Nazirite vows in most cases were quite temporary, usually 30 to 100 days, there were also those who were Nazirites from birth to death e.g. Samson (Judges 13:7) and John The Baptist (Luke 1:15-17)

Nazirite vows were not just a pre-Christian practice. The apostle Paul, a man who wrote much of the New Testament, took a Nazirite vow on occasion (Acts 18:18, 21:22-26) (see also On The Road To Damascus and Paul's First Missionary Journey and Paul's Second Missionary Journey and Paul's Third Missionary Journey).

Fact Finder: After the angel announced to Samson's parents that he would be a Nazirite from birth, how did the angel go back up into the sky?
Judges 13:20


this is the christian texts that support dreading
every religion has some


echolynnrain said:
I wanted to add this...the story of Samson and Delilah. A lot of you have probably heard the story even if you're not a Christian. If you don't know the story...in a nutshell it is this...

Samson has super strength from God...and it's in his locks of hair. Delilah tries to trick him into telling her his secret. She cuts it off while he's sleeping and it grows back. She eventually brings him down by tricking him one again and he prays and then brings down the pillars on the people who wanted to kill him. There are scholars and Christains I know who believe that the locks were in fact dreads. When I get dreads going I may have to use this if I'm discriminated at a church, lol. :)
Sweet. IDK some of this....thanks fo sharing

Jelly said:
Nazarites wore their hair locked. Sampson had seven locks, which he cut and lost his strength. A few restrictions that went with it: no grapes or raisins - to include wine and vinegar, avoidance of the deceased (exceptions are allowed, Sampson was a warrior.), the vow must last no less than 30 days and is as simple as when seeing another person in observation of the Nazarite vow and saying to oneself, "Me, too."

I should find a link, but i haven't ad coffee yet.

J
Love the info....thank you SE

MY REASONS ARE BETTER THAN YOURS!

if only i had dreads :*(

oh do enlighten us

what are your reasons and what makes them better?



TheOhm said:

MY REASONS ARE BETTER THAN YOURS!

if only i had dreads :*(

Its a secret. and i prefer to keep my secrets on 'lock' and key. ;) care to share your reason for having dreadlocks. I think that one deserves a topic of its own.

Well, my reason is because I got so tired of perms really. My locks saved my life. They (my locks) help me learn to love me again, that's really it :-)

Just wanna say that I felt you really summed up the purpose of the entire sub-culture and the cyber-locks very nicely.

Spider Feet said:

I consider the dreadfalls worn in the cybergoth sub-culture to be in a pseudo spiritual sensuality. Cybergoth is largely based on artistic expression inspired by the modern primitive movement. It's kind of a mixture taken from various books and movies about cyberpunk and post apocalyptic settings. Like modifying self, environment and objects to suit ones own needs.

In reality, I don't feel it has much relation to that anymore....it's just a pretty way of dressing by people mildly interested in counter-culture...

Question here, wondering if anybody knows the answer.  In Rastafarian beliefs, is there at all a time where it would be okay to cut off your locks?  For instance, something like having a child?  Or anything I suppose that so life changing, you cut em off and start your journey all over again?  Just wondering.  Thanks in advance.

No a true rasta wouldn't ever have a reason to do this. :) 

BeauZay said:

Question here, wondering if anybody knows the answer.  In Rastafarian beliefs, is there at all a time where it would be okay to cut off your locks?  For instance, something like having a child?  Or anything I suppose that so life changing, you cut em off and start your journey all over again?  Just wondering.  Thanks in advance.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2014   Created by ☮ soaring eagle ॐ.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

Image Zoom