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Forum Activity for @Baba Fats

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
03/17/13 09:09:47AM
2,730 posts



There is a member on here who makes jewelry for locks. She's got a shop on etsy. It might also be posted on our shops page. I can't remember. Eagle might know. Or try searching dreadlock jewelry

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
03/17/13 09:09:47AM
2,730 posts



There is a member on here who makes jewelry for locks. She's got a shop on etsy. It might also be posted on our shops page. I can't remember. Eagle might know. Or try searching dreadlock jewelry

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
05/17/14 10:23:14AM
2,730 posts

Clarifying Shampoo.


Dreads Hair and Scalp Health

Dr. Bronners, like all Castile soaps are terrible in hard water. The minerals in hard water don't break down the soap like it should. While Dr. B's is the best bang for you buck, it just isn't for everyone.

When I've bought Vicki's liquid shampoo, 1 bottle has lasted me about 2 months of washing 2-3 times a week. So the price shouldn't be prohibitive. It's only $10-$15.

As for it making your hair soft, it may feel softer than with Dr. B's or BS, because it's not just stripping the oils away, leaving nothing left. It does mildly condition your hair. Which is a good thing, when the right oils and the right concentrations are used. So your hair will feel softer and lighter. It will still knot well.

Claire, the easiest way to find out is to call you local water dept. I know calling a government agency can be a hassle to get someone on the phone. But it'll be the clearest answer you can get. Colorado, due to the mountains can easily have different water types. The same town can lie on 2+ watersheds, so they actually get their water from different sources. Your county could say one thing on their website, as a general rule. but if you call and give them your address, they can give you the real answer

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
05/16/14 06:02:38AM
2,730 posts

Not Locking Well?


Dread Maintenance

Yeah, the wax delayed all progress. What it did was just stick your hair together. When your hair is stuck in place, it can't get tangled, which is what forms the knots. So taking out the wax will pretty much start you over from where they were the first day you put it in. They will most likely unravel for a while before the real knotting starts.

The problem with them feeling dry is that they'll feel dry on the outside, but still be wet inside. You may not even be able to notice. Hot water, alone, only helps melt the wax and move it deeper into your locks. Even with a normal soap, it won't get that wax out. Normal dreadlock soaps don't have detergents in them, so the wax is not broken down and removed.

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
05/15/14 07:52:05PM
2,730 posts

Not Locking Well?


Dread Maintenance

Sorry to hear you got sucked into the wax trap. Unfortunately, any wax at all is too much. At it's best, was prevents all locking. But most likely, it will cause mold and mildew to build up over time. This is because wax is a hydrocarbon, and doesn't break down when it's wet. Instead, it hold water in your locks and never dries.

The best thing to do is get the wax-b-gone. Like Eagle said, Dawn dish soap would work, but it takes a lot of sessions, over months.

If it's been 8 months, I'd get the wax-b-gone as well as the mold remover, just to be safe. I'm not saying there is mold, but it's better be be on the safe side, there.

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
05/04/14 07:05:06PM
2,730 posts

Just another reason to wash


Dread Maintenance

I know most of us are great about washing. Eagle, myself (when I was around more often), and many others do our best to stress how important it is to wash your locks. And I know a bunch of you have already heard about how washing helps locks mature faster. This is 100% true. Of course the first few weeks of your locks will see them untangle. That's only natural. But don't get alarmed. Washing does create knots.

The main reason I've decided to post this is that, as some of you know, my wife and I just adopted a puppy. He was too young for a bath last week, but now he;s getting old enough, and we went to buy a him a brush. On the back label, every brush I looked at said to brush before you wash them. The reason they all gave was that water makes mats get tighter. If dog companies know this, and warn you about it, there's no reason that anyone here should be afraid to get their locks wet, often. Since mats are what we're all going for.

Obviously there's such a thing as too much washing. But 2-3 times a weeks is perfect for baby locks.


updated by @Baba Fats: 01/13/15 10:03:51PM
Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
01/02/14 03:06:55PM
2,730 posts

crocheting


Dreading Methods

I understand what you're saying, but when 90% of the damage is on the inside of the lock, you can't tell that he's not doing damage. If your locks get fuzzy after a while, and you "need" to go back to have them pulled back through, that is the damage showing up. Yes natural locks get fuzzy. But not nearly as fuzzy as crocheted locks do. Those hairs popping out are broken hairs from the crocheting. And every pass of the hook to "fix" them, only makes more to pop out the next time.

Unfortunately, there's no way to crochet without doing extreme harm, no matter how "experienced" you are. Crochet hook are sold at art supply stores, and not hair salons for a reason. They aren't haircare tools

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
01/02/14 10:35:06AM
2,730 posts

crocheting


Dreading Methods

Even without back combing, the hook is not designed to be used on such a thin fiber as hair. it does do a considerable amount of damage. But you're right. if you don't maintain them, they will loosen up and mature properly. So just crocheting once, to start, is not the worst thing in the world. It does damage, but will not completely destroy locks. It's when it's done over and over again that it does the most harm. Once locks start to tighten, even a little bit, sticking a crochet hook through it shreds hair. There is no way to stick a needle through your locks and not damage hair. The hook is dozens of time thicker than a hair. Once the lock starts tightening, the hair doesn't have anywhere to move out of the way, so it rips.

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
12/30/13 10:11:16PM
2,730 posts

Seperating & sectioning


Introduce Yourself

At 4 weeks, they shouldn't be mature enough to not separate at all. You should be able to find some part of them (either at the tips or, less ideally, at the root) to rip apart. I know "ripping" sounds aggressive, but it's easy. I have 2 vids on my page showing how to do it safely

Baba Fats
@Baba Fats
12/31/13 07:02:03PM
2,730 posts

just wondering


Introduce Yourself

What is the smell like? Is it just a musky smell, or more of a wet-dog smell? If it's only a mild musk, it can most likely be fixed with certain oils. If it's more of a wet dog smell, it could possibly be mold/mildew. That is also fixable, but more involved. It also depends on if it smells when it's dry vs. wet


updated by @Baba Fats: 07/22/15 05:59:03AM
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