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Dreads and Ethnicity

☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
6 years ago
27,427 posts

i musta missed that but the thing is worldwide more then 1/3 of rastafarians are not black rasta is a religion not a race there are asian indian (both from india and native american) swedish german jewish well u get the idea rastafarians come from all walks of life

but at the same time

globaly only 1/2 or less of blacks with dreads are rastas and only 1/4 or so of whites with dreads are rastas

well no those estimates are probably high maybe 10 and 15% i wasnt thinking globaly at all just america the islands and europe but arab and asia and india and all the rest have so many dreads that arent rastas it really drives that down

theres way more non rasta dreadies out there then rasta but the averages vary county to country

odviosly jamaican dreads are probly more then 70 or even 80 percent rasta

but even reggae isnt all rasta either theres essene reggae buddhist reggae and jewish too

even hare krishne

there are impostafarians fir sure ppl who act the act without believing in it but that dont mean they have dreads or they have dreads to act like rastas

(not all rastas have dreads either dreads are not a requirement of the religion only a personal choice of those who seek to live theyre beliefs to the fullest extent)




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
Freedoms wings international

updated by @soaring-eagle: 07/22/15 12:23:51PM
Conner Hannon
@conner-hannon
6 years ago
27 posts

yea the whole idea this article is presenting is breeding nothing more than ignorance which is why I posted it. Its almost humorous.

Thundersquall
@thundersquall
6 years ago
235 posts

I know its true that many white folk look down upon white folk in particular for having dreads...but not fair to say allcaucasions dont look good with em cause i have seen some black folk who dont look good with dreads too. Again tho, when was rocking dreads in a modern day era truly and onlyabout the "aesthetic" look of it anyways?

One thing i will say tho which could create some hot debate is that Elvis Presley did take black music and songs and turn em mainstream for a white audience. I also think colonel sanders did the same thing with fried chicken lol.But then again,what is America if not a melting pot of culture apropriations?But dreadlocks themselves are age old ancestry to every human who never bothered with a comb. Period.

Aaron"TheLegend"
@aaronthelegend
6 years ago
283 posts
It's just a bunch of close minded black guys trying to up themselves and "their" ways instead of opening their eyes and opening their knowledge.
Thundersquall
@thundersquall
6 years ago
235 posts

Masai warriors in africa are known for their dyed red dreads as well..very true what you said though is not imitation the highest form of flattery?
Maxe said:

I don't get why some of the commenters on that site are annoyed that people from other races are embracing things that were originally only a part of african american subculture (not talking about dreads, the only african heritage I know forsomething like dreadsis the Hima tribe).

The world is becoming globalised and african americans should be proud that their influence on the melting pot has been so big (jazz, blues, RnB, hip-hop, clothes, foods, slangetc.)

Just think back 100 years where all those things would have been considered outrageous by all 'white' people...nowadays the 'black' influence is almost predominant.

DeMarco Ryans
@demarco-ryans
6 years ago
22 posts
I think for some people they see dreadlocks as their heritage and theirs alone. Without an in depth understanding of History it is easy to see how one could come to this conclusion. However with common sense you would figure if hair is left for a long period of time then it dreads, regardless of ethnicity.I think it is the culture and belief structure that many of the purist and even not so purest Rastafarians seek to maintain. If you look at the history that relates to that you'll see why. Particularly when it comes to the resistance of Addis Abbaba against Itlay.I'm not going speak to much on this subject exclusively as I too find it wrong and wish not to defend it. However I would say to those of us here who are white that in the eyes of many cultures around the world you are seen as a threat and a danger to that culture. This is something that begins with the partition of Africa, for black people, for people in Polynesian Islands it is the work of Anglo and French Missionaries, that almost wiped out the tatu, a birth right and long living tradition for which some islands have had to start again. In New Zealand it can be the stealing of Wahakapapa as a tattoo on not just a white person but anyone form the west who does not have a right to wear that genealogy line and so it continues.Please do not let me be misunderstood. I am aware, compassionate and educated enough to know that these actions are things off the past, and that even at that time there were people who believed it wrong, but for many considering that white people are often perceived to be in a position of hegemony as far as social political economic and social structure I guess there is a fear that where part of what they see as their culture or identity is embraced it will be exploited for gain.The fact is this world has a whole lot of healing to do, as sub races we have a responsibility to one another to heal wounds, allay fears and build bridges. Only then as a race will we be able to truly move forwards.I no longer speak to my parents for multiple reasons, one of which was the fact that I wouldn't break up with my girlfriend who is soon to be my fiance because she is white when they demanded I do so. I lost black friends who said it was ok for me to have white friends and even experiment with other races, but that as a black man who has an ability to move forwards and do some monumental things in my life I should be doing so with a black wife and black children. It makes me laugh as I am probably the blackest person in my family in terms of genetics. My grandfather looked like all the races of this world rolled into one and bless his heart at 99 years old he was one of the most beautiful people I have ever seen in this world.Anyway, those are my few shillings (keepin it English ;- ) )One Love, One Heart
DeMarco Ryans
@demarco-ryans
6 years ago
22 posts
Away from tribes you also have the dreadlocks formed under the conditions of slavery. Those that survived the journey often and very filthy neglect dreads which were cut off when they were put up for auction. Gotta understand there is still a lot of hurt for black people when it comes to how far back the race has been set back. Some just can't move forwards, and that to me is even worse

Maxe said:

I don't get why some of the commenters on that site are annoyed that people from other races are embracing things that were originally only a part of african american subculture (not talking about dreads, the only african heritage I know forsomething like dreadsis the Hima tribe).

The world is becoming globalised and african americans should be proud that their influence on the melting pot has been so big (jazz, blues, RnB, hip-hop, clothes, foods, slangetc.)

Just think back 100 years where all those things would have been considered outrageous by all 'white' people...nowadays the 'black' influence is almost predominant.

DeMarco Ryans
@demarco-ryans
6 years ago
22 posts
All the days of the vow of his separation no razor shall come upon his head; until the days are fulfilled for which he separated himself to the LORD, he shall be holy. Then he shall let the locks of the hair of his head grow.

Numbers 6, The Vow of the NaziriteThe fact is, you can find origins for dreadlocks all over the world at different times, because they are universal. They can not and should never be compartmentalised
☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
6 years ago
27,427 posts

actualy africans who worked clamming and such who had theyre dreads dangeling in the ocean and had cowry shells stuck in theyre dreads were concidered hard workers because of the shells in theytre dreads so got a higher price not that that lowers the hurt u meantioned just correcting a fact that theyre dreads were not always cut and some were actualy prized fior the conditions of the dreads at least till after the auctions then they may have been cut i dunno

i just know thats where the tradition of wearing shells in dreads came from

but the thing that they dont get is although dreads are popular amongst rastas and african culture they were popular amongst all other cultures as well

the idea that they are an afrocentric phenomena is flawed

and its basis is mostly on the sterotype that all dreads are rastas or wannabe rastas

DeMarco Ryans said:

Away from tribes you also have the dreadlocks formed under the conditions of slavery. Those that survived the journey often and very filthy neglect dreads which were cut off when they were put up for auction. Gotta understand there is still a lot of hurt for black people when it comes to how far back the race has been set back. Some just can't move forwards, and that to me is even worse



Maxe said:

I don't get why some of the commenters on that site are annoyed that people from other races are embracing things that were originally only a part of african american subculture (not talking about dreads, the only african heritage I know forsomething like dreadsis the Hima tribe).

The world is becoming globalised and african americans should be proud that their influence on the melting pot has been so big (jazz, blues, RnB, hip-hop, clothes, foods, slangetc.)

Just think back 100 years where all those things would have been considered outrageous by all 'white' people...nowadays the 'black' influence is almost predominant.




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
Freedoms wings international
☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
6 years ago
27,427 posts

altho i will say 1 thing on race and dreads

it pisses me off when ppl who have dreads are disrespectful to rastas and dreads who are african and act like the worse thing in the world would be to be called a rasta

if your gonna dread u should have respect for all cultures that respect dreads

that is if u want to get respect back

i have alotta rastsa freinfds and get alotta respect from themby simply giving them the respect they desserve too

when u dread u shouldnt be insulting those who also dread especialy if u dread for fashion and they dread as a spiritual commitment




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
Freedoms wings international
 
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