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i need biblical references to dreadlocks my church kicked me out for wanting to dread

amethyst777
@amethyst777
4 years ago
95 posts

WoW! I hope I didnt' have anything to do with that last post.. I'm not against Christians at all. I do believe the original poster should find a more accepting church. I know people from all sorts of different religions, and some that have no religion at all. There are good people and bad people from all sorts of backgrounds. It just sounds like this specific church isn't a good fit anymore. That happens, even with pastors from churches, sometimes they just don't fit anymore.
Personally, I love spirituality, but can't stand "religion". I feel my personal beliefs fall closer to a Hindu belief system, but still not close enough to label myself with any one religion.


updated by @amethyst777: 07/28/15 08:19:50PM
Κύριε Ελέησόν
@κύριε-ελέησόν
4 years ago
92 posts
Nah, I didn't get that vibe from you, Amethyst! :) Sorry to have made ya worry because I don't want anybody who hasn't said stuff like that feeling like I'm addressing them. And I won't point out who did post such things though. We are all adults and know when we have done wrong.I am similar to you on my beliefs. I am Christian - a lowly one at that - but I understand that people have many different beliefs and there is no hard, tangible proof that one way is right or wrong or what have you.... I have proof enough for only myself. You have proof enough only for yourself. Should you start to question though, then perhaps you're being called elsewhere otherwise stick with what you believe to be right! Except dont do the obvious ones like drinking the Kool-Aid to meet the mother ship ;) buuuut in the end... I could even be wrong on that! Who's to say??*Sidenote: I do NOT condone suicide even for a spiritual/religious matter.*Regardless though, I agree... No matter what religion or background, there will be good and bad people. The OP had the misfortune of finding a bad lot or yeah, maybe just outgrowing his parish. He does need to leave that church. I'm sure not everyone there wanted him ousted(so I hope!!!) but it seems that the louder folks usually end up representing all.And spirituality is a vital component of life, imo. What is the purpose of living if we don't strive to make ourselves better in all ways than we were yesterday?? :)Much love!
amethyst777
@amethyst777
4 years ago
95 posts

OK good, cause I try really hard not to bash anybody's belief system :)

Mons
@mons
4 years ago
523 posts

From MY experience, those that have to defend their Christianity vehemently are the biggest hypocrites. They are the ones who do what they please, cheat on spouses, on taxes, steal, lie, covet, and in general disregard everyone but themselves. I have been told by people like this that that behavior is ok because they ask for forgiveness at the end of the day. It's the people (that I know personally)that live quietly, do good for others, are respectful of others, live a good life in general are the most devout. They don't feel they have to defend themselves, they don't feel they have to convert everyone to their way of worship.

I'm sure the majority of the replies to this post have been based on the same or very similar experiences. It's very hard sometimes not to generalize one group when the most profound experiences with that group have been the same negative experiences. Then you throw in a politician or some other public figure who takes it upon themselves to speak for that particular group....they are strengthening that generalization or stereotype. Much like the President of the United States speaking on behalf of the entire US. Not everyone feels the way the speech writer for the President feels. Yet one person in another country who sees that speech on the news may think that every single person in the US feels that way. It's ignorant, but it happens.


B likes Tea
@b-likes-tea
4 years ago
21 posts

I know the OP was over 2 years ago now, but I had a somewhat similar situation happen recently (I posted a discussion a while back if you're interested) so this topic is really interesting to me.
I think a part of the problem is that the crappy "dreadheads" have screwed us other dreadheads. You know, the "dreadheads" who don't wash and therefore their hair is dirty and stinks. Just like not all "christians" are hateful, not all dreadlocks are dirty and stink. And not all dreadheads smoke weed either (that doesn't necessarily make those that DO smoke crappy, drugs are just generally frowned on by some).
A lot of people still think that dreads are dirty and associate them with drugs and weed smoking. So, I think its important that we remember that we were once ignorant about dreadlocks too (most of us anyways), and that we inform people as best as we can and hopefully abolish these preconceived notions!
But if they aren't willing to listen, you should probably just separate yourself from them (if possible). They probably aren't people you want/need in your life anyways.
"For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them. -Matthew 18:20(ESV)
So, if you feel like theres something wrong with the "church" you're going to now, you could just take a friend and worship God in your own house or back yard! Like others have said, I would love to worship out in God's beautiful earth, rather than a man-made building. Hey, Jesus preached on a mountain top and from a boat to the people on a beach! Now THAT sounds beautiful.

Κύριε Ελέησόν
@κύριε-ελέησόν
4 years ago
92 posts
Mons, I understand ignorance happens but, as unfortunate as it is, it is inexcusable. It shouldn't be allowed to perpetuate. Underneath it all, we all know to generalize and stereotype is wrong. We face it just from our way we wear our hair (and perhaps other areas of our existence) and we understand what it's like to be on the receiving end of such judgement. We may sometimes suffer it in silence when we haven't the energy to explain otherwise or if we feel it's a moot point to attempt to explain. I feel energized and I feel like most people here (if not everyone!) has an open-mind. :)As stated in your post, those who seem to vehemently defend their Christianity and are the most vocal about their beliefs seem to universally be the worst kind. In essence though, they aren't Christian based on their actions and true beliefs. We all know someone can talk until they're blue in the face but actions do the real talking! :) You are also correct when you say the best ones just try to live a modest and devout life. I completely agree with these notions. II think it goes along the lines of no matter what, there are good and bad people.I'm sorry if I came off a bit heated. I was pretty disappointed and hurt. The ultimate intention of my post was to call out and mostly to try and stop the blatant stereotyping and hateful talk from some members of a community that I was drawn to because I saw it as understanding and compassionate. I believe most of us don't fit in very well with the world for these reasons; we choose to shun the evils of our modern world and embrace a higher calling. Our dreads may be a common symbol of this but maybe not for everyone. I understand for some, it is simply a hairstyle. I still felt many here are open and caring people so to read some of these comments broke my heart.The points I made about Christianity were in the hopes that some of those people would see it's not all bad and it's not all what you may hear about (or unfortunately experience) from the people who wrongly claim Christianity, or the media, or from some of its ignorant followers. There are some of us who mean well. Unfortunately, like discussed earlier, most of them are silent. A good example of this is the Orthodox church and many of its followers.Maybe the OP is a devout Christian whom means well but was turned off from this community by some of the comments. Think about what he might have gone on to think about us if he joined here seeking a dready group accepting of all dreadheads only to read some of those comments.We all want understanding and tolerance, we shouldn't be ok allowing hatred or otherwise ill feelings about an entire group into our hearts. Otherwise, we may miss out on or reject otherwise wonderful individuals. Please think about it.That's all. Much love!
Κύριε Ελέησόν
@κύριε-ελέησόν
4 years ago
92 posts
I don't know how to edit my posts, lol, but "Please think about it." was vague. It wasn't addressed to you, Mons, personally but to anybody harboring negative feelings. Sorry!!!And I shouldn't just say "hatred... ill feelings... about groups..." But those feelings about anyone in general. I should've said instead that we shouldn't be ok allowing stereotypes.I am a dork and had to clarify, lol.
caleb2
@caleb2
3 years ago
2 posts

Dear Brandon Law:

I know it has been almost three years since you typed your original question, but I want to respond now.

I have strong feelings about this topic. Please understand that I believe this is a very important Spiritual topic.

Please further understand that all I type below is typed out of genuine Christian love and solicitude for you and your friends.

Of course, you may disagree with me. If so, please reply accordingly. I submit this letter in the spirit of strong Christian advice and counsel, but also in the spirit of good-natured academic discussion.

Finally, Brandon, please know that I have performed all the research below, just for you, by myself. I have done all of it for you specifically, from scratch.

I apologize for the different type-sizes or fonts. That occurred accidentally. Even though some of the type is larger or smaller, if it is not in quotation marks, it was typed by me.

With that introduction, let me begin.

Dreadlocks are un-Christian, without question. Anyone wearing dreadlocks in the United States in contemporary society, could not possibly have come to understand what they were and to be attracted to them, and to wear them, without having been influenced by un-Christian, or non-Christian traditions, customs and styles.
Dreadlocks have come to be popular in the United States for only one reason: for the reason that they became popular in Jamaica among the Jamacian Rastafari in the 1950s and 1960s.
This basic point is easily proven by reference to any American dreadlocks-related website. I refer you to the following passage from the dreadlocks-related "Dready Girl" website, particularly the subpage thereof which has to do with the "History of Dreadlocks," which I easily found:
"The precise date of origin of the hairstyle is unknown. However dates range from 5000 BCE to 1500 BCE. The roots of dreadlocks can be trailed to the Rastafarians of Jamaica, and further, to Indian sages and yogis, but they have never been more popular or widespread than they are today. It is said that dreadlocks originated with eastern holy men, possessing nothing, renouncing the world and possessions (not even a comb) and even personal grooming, hence the inevitable dreadlocks."
To read the whole "Dready Girl" website, please visit:
I must repeat the passage from this "Dready Girl" webpage for emphasis to drive home the obvious, well-accepted notion that, for persons living in the United States, dreadlocks absolutely have their origins in the Rastafari of Jamaica: "The roots of dreadlocks can be trailed [traced] to the Rastafarians of Jamaica . . . ."
The Rastafari, in turn, were inspired to wear dreadlocks by seeing news photos of the Mau Mau people, taken during the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya in 1952-1960.
The Kenyan Mau Mau people are a subgroup of the Kenyan Kikuyu People.
The Kikuyu are the predominant people of Kenya. They were originally formed of the Bantu which migrated to Kenya either from the North/Northeast or the South.
I have found this written about the origin of dreadlocks, in the Wikipedia Article on Dreadlocks:
"The Mau Mau, a largely ethnic Kikuyu rebel group in Kenya fighting to overthrow the state government of the BritishColony and Protectorate of Kenyafrom 19521960, hid for many years in the forests, during which time their hair grew into long locks. The images of their rebellion, then broadcast around the world, are said to have inspired Jamaican Rastafari to wear locks.[8]"
The religion of the Kikuyu People, and hence the Mau Mau, is not Christianity. I have found the following in the Wikipedia Article about the Kikuyu People:

"Spirituality and religion

"Ngai - The creator
"The Gky were - and still are - monotheists believing in a unique and omnipotent God whom they refer to as Ngai. Both the Gky, Embu and Kamba use this name. God was also known as Murungu by the Meru and Embu tribes, or Mulungu (a variant of a word meaning God which is found as far south as the Zambezi of Zambia). The title Mwathani or Mwathi (the greatest ruler) which comes from the word gwatha meaning to rule or reign with authority was-and- is also used.
"Mount Kenya and religion
"Ngai or mwene-nyaga is the creator and giver of all things, "the Divider of the Universe and Lord of Nature". He (God) created the human community. It is also believed that He created the first Gky communities, and provided them with all the resources necessary for life: land, rain, plants and animals. He cannot be seen but is manifest in the sun, moon, stars, comets and meteors, thunder and lightning, rain, in rainbows and in the great fig trees (Mugumo). These trees served as places of worship and sacrifice and marked the spot at Mkre wa Gathanga where Gky and Mmbi the ancestors of the Gky in the oral legend first settled.
"Yet was not a distant God (as known in the West). He has human characteristics, and although some say that He lives in the sky or in the clouds, Gky lore also says that he comes to earth from time to time to inspect it, bestow blessings and mete out punishment (similar to God's visit of Abraham before destroying Sodom). When he comes He rests on Mount Kenya and krma ka njah (Kilimambogo). Thunder is interpreted to be the movement of God and lightning is the weapon used by Ngai to clear the way when moving from one sacred place to another. Some people believe that Ngais abode is on Mount Kenya, or else beyond its peaks. Ngai, one legend says, made the mountain his resting place while on an inspection tour of earth. In the account God then took the first man, Gikuyu, to the top to point out the beauty of the land he was giving him."
The religion of the Rastafari is not Christianity. I found the following in the Wikiepdia Article on Rasta, or the Rastafari:
"TheRastafari movement, orRasta, is anAbrahamicspiritual movement[1]that arose in the 1930s inJamaica. Its adherents worshipHaile Selassie I, Emperor ofEthiopia(ruled 19301974), some asJesusincarnate, theSecond Advent, or the reincarnation of Jesus, others asGod the Father."
There is no doubt that dreadlocks are, for Americans, who wear them in America, associated only with non-Christians. Dreadlocks are a religious symbol of religions other than Christianity. That point is inescapable.
The Rastafariworship Haile Selassie I because they believe he is jesus or god. The Kikuyu Mau Mau worship Ngai who they believe often visits Mount Kenya and is embodied in the sun, moon, stars, comets and meteors.
If you wear dreadlocks, you are wearing the symbol of religions which worship Haile Selassie and/or meteors.
I am only pointing out the truth. The truth is that, for Twentieth Century and Twenty-first Century Americans, living in the United States, it is inescapable that the dreadlocks which they wear here in the United States of America, came into American culture via the Jamaican Rastafarians in the 1950s and 1960s via the Mau Mau of the Kikuyu People of Kenya. All of those origins are absolutely non-Christian.
Sincerely yours,
Caleb Boone.
Κύριε Ελέησόν
@κύριε-ελέησόν
3 years ago
92 posts
Excellent research! Except I feel this needs clarified:The Rastafari absolutely are of Christian origin. They came fom the Ethiopian Orthodox Church and supposedly many still claim to be members. Haile Selassie actually denounced his divinity and pushed for Rastas to remain full members of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church.Otherwise, they still worship the one triune God, use the Bible as sacred text, and as far as I know - I haven't researched their doctrine too in depth so take it with a grain of salt - haven't changed many of the doctrines laid out by the Church.Here is an excellent conversation on the matter:http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?topic=25088.0Accordingly, to claim dreadlocks have no place in Christianity is technically incorrect. But you're absolutely correct that the only reason they're popular in American culture is because of the Rastfari movement.
Κύριε Ελέησόν
@κύριε-ελέησόν
3 years ago
92 posts
Oh, I guess I technically can't say Haile Selassie denied his divinity. That is misleading. Allegedly he denied it.
 
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