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baking soda and water theory

☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
5 years ago
27,412 posts

i am not sure but this makes sense to me

some ppl have probs with baking soda, tho some with hard water had no issues at all.

water quality is effected by 2 things

hardness which has to do with mineral content like calcium and lyme

and ph which has tio do with other impurities altering the acidity or alkalinity of the water

waters normal ..pure ph is 7.0 nuetral in fact thats the basis for the nutral on the scale

however like adding a lil acv to the water makes it acidic and bs added makes it alkaline other impurities can do the same.

soi when you have baking soda added to water thats ph is already too close to the alkalinity of the bakinmg soda it might not break it down as easily

solution?

a couple drops odf lemon juice or somethng to swing the ph back to nuetral

im not sure it will do the trick but it seems theoreticaly possible to fix the problem that way




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
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updated by @soaring-eagle: 02/14/15 04:43:03AM
Castaway J
@castaway-j
5 years ago
588 posts

haha if you would have posted this a few hours ago i could have tried it out. next time though i will and let you know if i see any difference. vegas has very hard water and has always given my dry skin and a dandruffy scalp. this reminds me of my 5th grade science project where i took samples from various water sources at school, at home, and around town testing ph balances. the water fountain at school, was surprisingly bad, i remember that lol

Heather
@heather
5 years ago
1,294 posts

i'll have to try that next time i wash my hair. i think i'm going to try acv rinses again. i haven't tried it since the beginning because it made my hair too soft but now my hair feels wrecked. how much acv should i use to just bring the ph of my hair back to normal but not leave it silky?

☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
5 years ago
27,412 posts

just a lil splash u can use like a spoonfull or so to a gallon and opour on rinse right away it only has to pass through the hair to reset the ph




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
Freedoms wings international
Heather
@heather
5 years ago
1,294 posts

okay. i'll try that. thanks!

soaring eagle said:

just a lil splash u can use like a spoonfull or so to a gallon and opour on rinse right away it only has to pass through the hair to reset the ph

Panterra Caraway
@panterra-caraway
5 years ago
665 posts

Yeah, this is a possibility...but the biggest problem is that you would have to test the ph of your hair, water and all substances used to get an accurate reading and then, use highly controlled amounts and proportions of each thing to get as close as possible to balanced ph. Thus, turning shower time into a mathmetic equation...not doable. Fail.

greenblayza
@greenblayza
5 years ago
17 posts

Though he did say neutral in his original post, I think what SE is getting at is a quick and easy way to make a situation better. A few trial and error attempts with some lemon juice seems like a pretty easy experiment with the possibility of a solution. I'm no scientist but if you can get the ph closerto neutral I think you'd be better off. By saying it's a "Fail" is a pretty negative way to look at some advice - unless you've tried it of course

Panterra Caraway said:

Yeah, this is a possibility...but the biggest problem is that you would have to test the ph of your hair, water and all substances used to get an accurate reading and then, use highly controlled amounts and proportions of each thing to get as close as possible to balanced ph. Thus, turning shower time into a mathmetic equation...not doable. Fail.

Sonja-Skye
@sonja-skye
5 years ago
10 posts

Citric acid should be similar enough to add in right?!?!

Alyssa Yuldybaeva
@alyssa-yuldybaeva
5 years ago
35 posts

You can order very cheap chinese papers on ebay! I ordered a lot before for my aquarium. My water turned out to be more to the alkaline side!

Panterra Caraway
@panterra-caraway
5 years ago
665 posts

Excuse me, I am a licensed hairstylist of 31 years and this "theory" doesn't fly. You can not accurately adjust the ph without looking at a million variables that SE is not taking into account. The results will be totally off. It just isn't that simple and to imply that is is shows the lack of understanding in this particular area. I realize he is trying to help, but it is not a workable solution. So yes, I have tried it...just a little bit over 31 years.

greenblayza said:

Though he did say neutral in his original post, I think what SE is getting at is a quick and easy way to make a situation better. A few trial and error attempts with some lemon juice seems like a pretty easy experiment with the possibility of a solution. I'm no scientist but if you can get the ph closerto neutral I think you'd be better off. By saying it's a "Fail" is a pretty negative way to look at some advice - unless you've tried it of course

Panterra Caraway said:

Yeah, this is a possibility...but the biggest problem is that you would have to test the ph of your hair, water and all substances used to get an accurate reading and then, use highly controlled amounts and proportions of each thing to get as close as possible to balanced ph. Thus, turning shower time into a mathmetic equation...not doable. Fail.

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