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Dr Bronner's?

Tay
@tay
2 years ago
43 posts

Hey all, I just bought the peppermint scented soap from Dr. Bronners and I have a question. I have a spray bottle and I want to know how much soap should I use per 1 cup of water? Also should I use it like any other shampoo or do I let it soak in my hair or what? Just letting you know that I don't have hard water.


updated by @tay: 01/13/15 10:02:30PM
Linus
@linus
2 years ago
44 posts

1 part dr bronners to 12 parts of water.

Just use it as a regular shampoo, massage it into your scalp it should lather up good.

Eric2
@eric2
2 years ago
3 posts

i use it as regular soap , just about half as much because apparently your supposed to dilute it , i usually just get my hair wet , squirt some on my head then message it in and then rinse it out really good

☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
2 years ago
27,420 posts

before using bronners google hard water map
if you have moderately or harder water , dont use it
if not its a 1-12 ratio 1 part bronners 12 parts water
(or more some do 18 20 even some 40) at least 12 though
no ther baking soda methods a soak bronners just wash with




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
Freedoms wings international
Sting.Rey
@stingrey
2 years ago
44 posts

I used to use Dr. Bronner's, I've since switched to the Dreadlocksshampoo.com products. For Dr. Bronner's a 1:12 ratio is a good place to start, the only problem is I find it takes a lot of water to wash out. My own recipe for an 8 oz (237 ml) "spray bottle" was 1 Tablespoon of Dr. Bronner's Peppermint & 1 Tablespoon of Dr. Bronner's Eucalyptus with 2 Teaspoons of Sea Salt. Two Tablespoons (29ml) total of soap to 8 oz (237ml) of water is very close to 12%, again a good place to start, but some find this ratio leaves their hair feeling too heavy so you might have to play with the formula and dilute it further like Soaring Eagle suggested.

Since your dreads are just starting out I would also add Sea Salt to the mix as I used to, use only a 3-4% salinity just like the Ocean. For an 8 oz bottle that is only 2 teaspoons of Sea Salt.

The Baking Soda & Apple Cider Vinegar rinse is good to do once a month to really deep clean the scalp & dreads and get rid of any deep lingering funk before it becomes a problem. Remember to boil the water first, it helps. Leave the ACV in a good long time so that it really soaks to the center of the dread, this helps bring the hair's pH back to normal and strengthens the hair. Here's a link to a really good discussion on proper ratios:

http://www.dreadlockssite.com/forum/topics/ratios-baking-soda-wash-...

The best advice I can give you though is keep the Dr. Bronner's and use it as a body soap and use the Liquid Locking Up Shampoo from the Dreadlocksshapoo.com site. I've tried them ALL, from Jamaican Mango & Lime, Knotty Boys, DreadheadHQ, Dr. Bronner's, and smaller local vendors. I can say from experience that the best hands down are the small batch Artisan made products made by Vicki, no other products even come close. She really cares about giving us the best made products with the best ingredients like using Himalayan Sea Salt in her formulas. They rinse out really well and boy do they smell great. Honestly I wish I had started using her products sooner. Here's a link:

http://shop.dreadlockshampoo.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=2

I like to use the Locking Up Sea Salt Accelerator spray as well in-between wash days, Vicki adds Icelandic Kelp and other plant based proteins to help strengthen the hair.

http://shop.dreadlockshampoo.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&a...

Lastly head out the beach. Swim, surf, free dive, anything as long as your in the water. Ocean water is the best for frizzing up & locking up hair. It'll be all poofy once it dries before they start to mature so take a bandana if you don't like to rock the beach head look.

Good luck and blessings on your Journey brother & keep us posted.

Tay
@tay
2 years ago
43 posts

Thank you all for the tips. I have one more question. I finally used it today and my experience with it seems to have worked I guess. After I rinsed it out, it definitely stripped my hair, that I could tell. I followed it with a rinse that they recommend. My slight concern is if the Dr. Bronners got my hair clean or not. With regular shampoo, you get the super lather and can see the dirt coming out of your hair. With the soap, it lathered, but I didn't see any dirt come out. So did I clean my hair well enough or what?

☮ soaring eagle ॐ
@soaring-eagle
2 years ago
27,420 posts

yes it doesnt need to lather either

u should only see dirt come out when extremely dirty




--
Creator and head dreadhead at:
Dreadlocks Site
Glider pilot student at:
Freedoms wings international
Sting.Rey
@stingrey
2 years ago
44 posts

With Dr. Bronner's you are using a true Castile soap (Castile soap is made from olive oil). True soaps do not lather up nearly as much as the artificial detergent soaps we grew up with. Artificial detergent soaps & shampoos contain sodium lauryl (or laureth) sulfate a foaming agentbecause most peoplecorrelate foaming (lather) action with cleansing action. There has been discussion and research as to how harmful sodiumlaurelsulfate is with the FDA claiming it not to be harmful (they also knew cigarettes cause cancer for over thirty years before theywere forced to let the public know). One thing that has been found in some products containing sodiumlaurelsulfate is1,4-Dioxane which has beenclassified as probable carcinogen by the EPA. Your body's largest organ is your skin why would you want anything on it that could possibly be harmful.

The problem with big commercial soap manufacturers is they remove one of the best ingredients in natural soap which is glycerin (ever wonder why your hair and skin feel so dry after you shower?) effectively making it a detergent and add fillers. They take the glycerin and make skin moisturizers and hair conditioners. One thing you'll notice with natural artisan soaps is they do not dry out your skin and hair, they also do not contain fillers, just soap and a few essential oils. They are a lot denser then "detergent" soaps and so they last a whole lot longer too especially if you use a tin travel soap box. You can also make them yourself, one of the Doctors I work with makes her own. Just be very be careful with your weights and measurements and especially with the Lye as it is very caustic use gloves, goggles & thick long sleeves. Here's a good link.

http://shalommama.com/homemade-bar-soap

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